eNotes@CSI - Employee Newsletter: Week of February 17, 2015

Week of February 23, 2015

The official employee newsletter of CSI since 1998

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Table of Contents

News and Information
Time Management Workshop for Students
Test Anxiety Group
Annual PEO Chapter D Hanging Baskets

Events and Action Items
Harlem Globetrotter Tickets
Dear White People
Campus Reads
Final Telescope Tuesday until November
CSI Supervisors: Attend Supervisor Training
Spring 2015 Brown Bag Topics
Join St. Luke’s for Jerome’s Annual Health Fair
CSI Employee Financial Planning Classes

Employee Wellness & Preparedness
Evening Childcare for the Rec. Gym
Schedule for Final Week of Employee Blood Pressure Checks
Why Diets Shouldn’t Tell You What NOT to Eat
Before you Travel this Spring Break, Vaccinate?
Ten Tips for Financial Health

Time Management Workshop for Students

Please encourage your students to attend a FREE Time Management Workshop put on by the Learning Assistance Center. They will learn to use their time effectively and how to prioritize their academics so their time is under their control.

Monday
February 23, 2015
4-5 pm

Tuesday
February 24, 2015
12-1 pm

Both of these workshops are located in the Meyerhoeffer Building (above the library) in Room 218 (Inside the Learning Assistance Center).

Kat Powell
Learning Center Coordinator
kpowell@csi.edu | 208-732-6685

Test Anxiety Group

Test Anxiety Workshops FlyerWe will be starting a new test anxiety group on 
Tuesday, February 24, at 2:00 pm. We'll meet in ooom 115 of the library (Meyerhoeffer) building. There will be 4 sessions, 1 hour weekly.

Students can access more information about test anxiety, including "Don't Be Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf", an online tutorial, at: 

https://careers.csi.edu/counselingServices/testAnxiety.asp

Kate Woods
Career and Counseling Services Coordinator
kwoods@csi.edu | 208-732-6303

Annual PEO Chapter D Hanging Baskets

cid:image003.png@01CF474A.E4B76550It’s time for the annual PEO Hanging Flower Basket Sale. Kathy Stover, CSI retiree and formerly of the ADC and Math Dept., moved to Boise and passed her duties onto Alice Anderson, CSI retiree and PEO member.

P.E.O., a Philanthropic Educational Organization where women celebrate the advancement of women, support women’s higher education through scholarships, grants, awards, loans, and stewardship of Cottey College, an independent, liberals arts and sciences college for women, helping women achieve their highest aspirations. 

Many of the members are educators, but women from nearly every profession and walk of life all over the world belong. There are at least five different PEO chapters in Twin Falls and several more around the Magic Valley. Twin Falls local Chapter D of P.E.O, sponsors this flower sale and donates all of the profits from our sales to the P.E.O. higher education projects. We appreciate your support in our annual fundraiser! Thank you!

Baskets are $24.00 each (22.64 + 1.36 tax). The baskets are huge and they last all summer long!

Basket varieties this year include: Ivy Geraniums in Red, Pink, Burgundy or Orange & Mixed Annuals in a wide variety of colors.
   
Ann Keane is helping PEO out with this project and has an order sheet up at the reception desk if you are interested. She must have the order sheet and payments turned into Alice on Mon., March 16th.

They make great Mother’s Day Gifts!

Baskets will be available for pickup Fri., May 8th between 4:00-6:00 pm at the TF Nazarene Church parking lot (1231 Washington St N – across from CSI).

Checks can be made payable to PEO Chapter D

Ann Keane
ADC
akeane@csi.edu | 208-732-6530

Harlem Globetrotter Tickets

 

 


The Harlem Globetrotters are offering discounted tickets for all CSI employees. Fill out the order form located at the link below to get yours now! If you have any questions you must contact Carl with the Harlem Globetrotters (info located on link). This offer is not available through the Athletic Office.

Order Form: http://www.csi.edu/events/2015HarlemGlobetrotterOrderForm.pdf

Ginger Nukaya
Administrative Assistant, Athletics
gnukaya@csi.edu | 208-732-6486

Dear White People

The CSI Diversity Council presents a showing of Dear White People. "A smart, hilarious satire of the Obama age." This video is all about being a black face in a white place.

Day: Thursday
Date: February 26, 2015
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Fine Arts 119

Perri Gardner
Diversity Council Rep.
pgardner@csi.edu | 208-732-6867

Campus Reads

If you will be attending the Campus Reads event on Thursday, February 26, at 1:00 in Hepworth 150, and you would like a chance to win a complimentary hard copy of the book, All the Light we Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (a Boise author), please go to the CSI Facebook page and "like" the post with a picture of the book. The winner will be announced on the facebook post in the comments on Thursday, February 26, by 3:00
pm.

Evin Fox, Ph.D.
Professor, CSI
efox@csi.edu | 208-732-6872

 

 

 

Final Telescope Tuesday until November

With daylight saving time just around the corner, February 24th will be the last Telescope Tuesday until November.  If you haven’t seen Comet Lovejoy yet, this may be your last chance as it continues to streak away from the earth and sun.  The moon is in the perfect phase for viewing, with dramatic shadows highlighting lunar craters and mountains.  Jupiter and its moons are well-placed for viewing in the east.  And many more targets, too numerous to list here, will be available.

Admission is $1.50 per person (free for ages 6 and under), but you can get in free with paid admission to the 7:00 PM showing of “Black Holes: The Other Side of Infinity” (with a live sky tour) in the Faulkner Planetarium

Chris Anderson, Coordinator
Centennial Observatory
canderson@csi.edu | 208-732-6663

CSI Supervisors: Attend Supervisor Training in Twin

CareerTrack is coming to Twin Falls on Friday, March 27, and bringing its training seminar on THE ULTIMATE SUPERVISOR.  This is a rare opportunity to receive supervisory training with your peers right here in town.  Seven of our own have already said they’re on board.

The cost is minimal – a day of your time and $139 per person, tax free, if we can get 5 or more to attend.  It runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and takes place at the Shilo Inn Suites at 1586 blue Lakes Blvd N.  Yes, this is the Friday of Spring Break. 

This training includes:

·         The role of the supervisor (AKA the office hero!)
·         Getting it all done with the power of superior organization
·         Building an A+ team
·         The challenges of change
·         Intro your future… no psychic powers necessary

Find a complete description online>>

The HR office is offering to coordinate attendance and registration and help you get there financially if you need.  Please reply to jheatwole@csi.edu with your interest and questions.  Talk to other supervisors in your work area and let’s get there as a team!

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator
jheatwole@csi.edu | 732-6269

Spring 2015 Brown Bag Topics

Brown Bag sessions. Please feel free to join us at any of the sessions.

Would you like to receive text message reminders of Brown Bag events? Click on this link and follow the directions: https://www.remind.com/join/8d63b7

Date
(noon)

Wednesday Group

Thursday
Group **

Location

2/25

Gender Equality with Pat Weber

Open Forum in Desert Café

Desert Cafe

3/4

Is passion the problem or the solution?

Open Forum in Desert Cafe

Desert Cafe

3/11

How do you bring Joy to work?

Open Forum in Desert Cafe

Desert Cafe

3/18

Using badges and gamifications

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

4/1

Engaging students in education.

Open Forum in Desert Cafe

Desert Cafe

4/8

The activist learner.

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

4/15

What is leadership?

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

4/22

How to Help Students Know What They Know.

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

4/29

Civility

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

5/6

Celebration—Resiliency and a Growth Mindset

Open Forum in Canyon 123

Hep 176

**Thursday group can be an extension of Wednesday’s group, or we can share new topics, and we will use the time in the computer lab to share technology ideas.

***Friday “Breakfast Club” will follow the Wednesday noon topics unless the group decides otherwise.

Evin Fox, Ph.D.
Professor, CSI
efox@csi.edu | 208-732-6872

Join St. Luke’s for Jerome’s Annual Health Fair

Saturday, March 14, 2015
Jerome Recreation District
2032 S. Lincoln Avenue
7 a.m.-noon

Tests Available:
Coronary Risk Profile*.$15
Comprehensive Metabolic Panel*.$15
Complete Blood Count.$10
Thyroid Stimulating Hormone.$15
Hemoglobin A1C.$10
*12-14 hours fasting is required for these tests.

Free nitrate testing on private wells. Bring in 1 cup of outside faucet water in a clean jar or zip-lock bag.

Free fitness classes and healthy snack idea seminars!

For information, please call (208) 814-9637.

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator

CSI Employee Financial Planning Classes

The Wellness Program and Community Education Department have partnered to provide CSI employees with a number of low-cost financial planning and fiscal health education opportunities:





401Ks: Roll It, Take It, Leave It, Move It - Know Your Employer Retirement Plan

Course Code - XCSI 001 C03
Thursday - February 26th
7 to 8:30pm
Discounted Price for CSI Employees - $7.50 (includes workbook)

Mastering Money: Managing and Investing for Gen X and Millennials
Course Code - XCSI 001 C04
Tuesdays - March 3rd & 10th
7 to 8:30pm
Discounted Price for CSI Employees - $10

Women Investors: A Woman's Retirement Outlook
Course Code - XCSI 001 C05
Wednesday - March 18th
7 to 8:30pm
Discounted Price for CSI Employees - $7.50 (includes workbook)

Social Security: Your Questions Answered
Course Code - XCSI 001 C06
Wednesday - April 8th
7 to 8:30pm
Discounted Price for CSI Employees - $12.50 (includes workbook)

Course descriptions can be found at http://communityed.csi.edu or by requesting a copy of the 2015 Spring Community education catalog.

For more information about these classes or assistance registering, please contact Diane at (208)732-6442 or dgause@csi.edu.  Space is limited - register now!

Ashley Schultz
Course Developer
College of Southern Idaho
208.732.6441

Evening Childcare for the Rec. Gym

Dear parents,

Thanks to a great suggestion from activity team captain Heidi Campbell and the enthusiastic cooperation of John Hughes and Child Development Lab Coordinator Jennifer Patterson we have secured evening childcare so parents of young children can come to campus and work out during the evening while our challenge is taking place!  Yeah!

So, here’s the plan:

For parents of 2 and a half through 5 year olds, on Tuesdays and Thursdays starting next Thursday the 19th, from 5:30 – 8 p.m., the Child Development Lab will happily care for your children until the start of Spring Break for FREE while you work out! Be prepared to deliver them after you’ve fed them for the evening as only a light snack will be served.  

Evening hours are new to the Child Dev lab and slots are available until they become filled by our students, so this may be a short-term offer but a great one for now.

Please call Jennifer Patterson at x6645 to express interest and register your child. 

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator

Schedule for Final Week of Employee Blood Pressure Checks

The CSI Employee Wellbeing Program would like to thank all the many health program students and their instructors, especially Kara Mahannah and Heather Reardon, for making their students available to practice their newly acquired skills for our greater good!  What a great partnership this has been!

 



  • Monday, February 23, 11:00-11:45 (MA students)
  • Tuesday, February 24, 11:00-11:45 (MA students)
  • Wednesday, February 25, 12:30-1:30 (PN students)
  • Friday, February 27, 12:30-1:30 Kara (MA students)

We will be in the Hepworth Building either in the main hallway near the north entrance or in with the ISU, BSU U of I transfer offices as they have a nice quiet area with table and chairs. Thanks for a great month of raising heart health awareness; with BP screenings.

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator

Why Diets Shouldn't Tell You What NOT to Eat

By Dr. Sherry Pagoto for US News Health

(This is an excellent article and study worth watching into the future!)

I have a 7-year-old daughter who has the annoying desire to play with my belongings, which often results in things getting lost or broken. One approach to getting her to stop this behavior is to follow her around and tell her “no.” If I tell her to stop playing with my clothes, she’ll go play with my makeup. I tell her no, and she’ll start to play with my computer. If I keep up with the routine of telling her "no" to everything she tries to do, two things will happen. Our whole day will be filled with negative exchanges, and she'll become increasingly frustrated. A better parenting approach is to fill her day with positive activities. I could set up an art project on the kitchen table; arrange a play date at the nearby sledding hill. The possibilities are endless.

This approach of reinforcing healthy behavior while ignoring the unhealthy comes from behavioral science and is not just applied to parenting. Behavioral treatments for depression are also heavily based on this approach. As psychologists, we don't tell people with depression to stop feeling bad, stop lying in bed, stop arguing with your spouse and so on. Instead, we have them think about all the activities in life that make them feel good, and we help them populate their time with those activities. This has a profound effect on mood.

Historically, researchers have used the “stop it!” approach to diet. They identify the “bad” food they think is responsible for obesity and then set up diets that prohibit people from eating it. The “bad” food used to be fat; now it's sugar. When we focus on restricting people from bad foods, surely they'll do as my daughter does (and what any of us would do): Fill their plates with the next best thing … until they're told not to eat that, either.
In our recent study – published February 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine – my colleagues and I decided to apply the same behavioral science-informed approach to diet. We found a food type that includes an enormous amount of variety and asked people to fill their plates with this food. The food type we selected was fiber, and we gave participants the goal of 30 grams per day. High-fiber foods include beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables and grains, which gives people a lot of choices. We chose fiber because no controversy exists whatsoever in the nutrition world about the health benefits of fiber. It isn’t one of those food types that research has flip-flopped on every few years. The data are clear about a host of health benefits of eating high fiber, including digestive health, cardiovascular disease risk reduction and cancer prevention.

In the study, we never told our participants what not to eat. We didn't say sugar was bad or fat was bad, because we wanted to avoid negative exchanges and frustration. We took the risk they might indulge in those foods anyway. We also never told them to count calories. Our message was clear: Focus entirely on the goal of 30 grams of fiber per day. Spread out the 30 grams across all meals and snacks. Get a wide variety of foods; don't rely on one food, or it may get boring. 
Continued online>>

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator

Before you Travel this Spring Break, Vaccinate?

By Dan Whitcomb, Reuters

California public health officials, grappling with a measles outbreak that has already sickened 113 people statewide, urged residents on Tuesday to vaccinate themselves and their children before traveling internationally over spring school break.

More than 150 people have been diagnosed with measles across the United States, many of them linked to an outbreak that authorities believe began when an infected person from out of the country visited Disneyland in late December.

The measles outbreak has renewed a debate over the so-called anti-vaccination movement, in which fears about potential side effects of vaccines, fueled by now-debunked research suggesting a link to autism, have prompted a small minority of parents to refuse inoculations for their children.
Continue this article online>>

As a follow up to this article the South Central Public Health group has forwarded their flyers and information on this topic. Please make sure you are prepared.





















































Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator

Ten Tips for Financial Health

These tips were part of the EAP Webinar this past week.

1. Try bringing your lunch to work every day instead of purchasing it. Food is almost always cheaper at a supermarket than a restaurant.

2. Separate wants from needs. Do you really need that 42-inch flat-screen television? When money is tight, it should not be spent unless absolutely necessary.

3. If you need to buy a car, buy one with a higher MPG (miles per gallon). For example, assume you have a choice between a 30 MPG car and a 15 MPG car. You drive 150 miles each week and gas is currently priced at $3.25 a gallon. Choosing the 30 MPG car would save you $72 a month!

4. Keep track of your spending. If you know where your money is going, it will be easier to make changes if you need to.

5. Avoid using credit to pay your bills. While it may make things easier now, using credit only increases your monthly payments in the future.

6. If you have direct deposit for your paycheck, have some of your paycheck directly deposited into your savings account. If you do not have direct deposit, set up an automatic transfer each month from your checking account to your savings account. It is easier to save if you make it an automatic process.

7. Avoid spending a significant amount of money on periodic purchases, like gifts and vacation. You may feel good while you are spending the money, but you will probably be wishing you had the money back later.

8. Cut or downgrade your services. Can you get a cheaper cable package or have no cable at all? If you have a cell phone, consider cutting your landline.

9. Instead of purchasing a book or magazine or renting a video, go the library. It's free!

10. Try lowering your energy bill. Turn off appliances and lights when they are not needed. Purchase energy-efficient light bulbs. When you can, try using a fan instead of air-conditioning and putting on a sweater instead of turning on the heat.

Balance Financial Fitness. (2008).

Judy Heatwole, MTD
Human Resource Specialist
Employee Wellbeing Coordinator